We had much travelling to fit into this day, so I was grateful for a slightly better night’s sleep. In the morning we joined a local congregation for Sunday worship. It was a Roman Catholic congregation who made us welcome and we arrived to the musical sound of the rosary being prayed. Also a young couple was standing before the priest with a very young baby, prayers and blessings being received (we assumed). Before long an invitation came to the (male) priest in our group to take quite an active part in the service. Though the majority of the worship was in Arabic (often illustrated on the overhead screen with very white depictions of Jesus) there was much in the pattern of worship that was familiar. A lovely mix of ages took active part – including many young acolytes and servers. Anointing was offered to all in commemoration of Our Lady of Lourdes. It felt very special share this experience and that of communion together. After church we joined in a quick cup of coffee and met a retired woman priest from Bristol who was working in Bethlehem. Our guide was in the meantime champing at the bit to be away because we had a long journey ahead. Our destination was north to the fortress at Masada, at least an hour and a half’s drive away. The drive takes us on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho and beyond. This is the silk road. We saw some amazing views of the Dead Sea, and such a variety of landscape – wilderness dotted with rock, scrubland, tall cliffs of layered rock and caves and huge plantations of date palms. Flocks of sheep and cattle wander, sometimes accompanied by herdspeople. At the fortress we take the cable car to the top and then have a rather speedy tour of the main part of the ruins. This is the place where, after the Romans conquered Jerusalem in 70CE, almost a thousand Jews (men, women and children) made a desperate last stand. When their blockade was finally breached, Masada’s defenders chose suicide rather than to live in slavery. Our guide hurries us along – ‘Let’s go!’ When we return down to the car park, we have a very late lunch and feed the birds with our left-overs. Then back to the guest house. Over supper the talk turned to consideration of what is central to our faith – heady stuff – and I felt slightly guilty that I am more concerned with whether my supply of cough sweets and tissues will be sufficient!

In the rock

a dark cave offers:

hiding place, shelter, darkness, escape, viewpoint …

Where is the God who believes in me?

Listen to the sound of silence.

Amen

 

Advertisements